National News

Senior lecturer in architecture at Deakin University and principal technical advisor on sustainability to the Melbourne Metro Rail Authority, Dr Phillip Roös, says that when Melbourne get its new underground railway stations, they will not only be welcome additions to the city’s public transport network. They will also be first piece of Australian public infrastructure that will include this type of biophilic design, boosting Melbourne’s ecological credentials.

Bring nature back into cities, planners told

By Sardaka (talk) 08:28, 8 July 2014 (UTC) - Own work, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=33832728
Posted on Wed, 2017-12-06 16:26 by APowell

New research shows that besides using the right species for the local environment, their social acceptability, economic use and Indigenous significance need to be carefully considered.

“There are many benefits of bringing nature back into urban areas,” says Dr Luis Mata from RMIT’s Interdisciplinary Conservation Science Research Group. “Nature in all its forms provides a remarkable range of benefits in cities.

State government's green plan to grow Sydney

Posted on Fri, 2017-12-01 11:16 by APowell

The NSW state government has proposed planting millions more trees as part of a plan that will significantly boost the amount of “green space” in the state. As the state’s population is expected to grow by 2.2 million people by 2036 and more Sydneysiders than ever are living in apartments, thegovernment wants to make sure there are enough trees, parks and wetlands to keep residents health.

With major challenges facing cities across the globe – from climate change, to ageing infrastructure and rising population densities – the work of landscape architects is needed now more than ever. These award-winning landscape projects are helping to sow the seeds of change.

Greening the workplace

green-wall
Posted on Mon, 2017-10-16 23:39 by Rosie M.

Trends come and go, but this one is underpinned by science. One recent study found that occupants of green-certified buildings have 26 percent higher cognitive function scores, sleep better, and report fewer health problems compared to those in uncertified buildings. As green roofs increase in popularity, it’s no surprise that architects are getting interested in green walls and their workplace potential.

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